My Blog

Dry SkinCold winds, low temperatures and dry indoor conditions can strip the skin of its natural oils that serve as a natural moisturizer. Although the cold winter months often cause dry skin, with proper skin care habits you can have a healthy complexion that lasts all season long.

You can’t control the harsh winter climate, but you can protect your skin by learning how to manage the factors that trigger dry, flaky skin.

How Can I Protect My Skin from Dryness

For starters, apply a heavy moisturizer or cream daily to help retain moisture and keep skin from drying out. Since strong, brisk winds can cause chapped skin, it is also important to cover exposed areas by wearing a hat, scarf or mittens when going out into the cold air.

Furnaces, radiators and fireplaces that you use to heat your home during cold winter months may feel wonderful in the middle of winter, but they can be extremely drying. To add moisture back into your home, try using a humidifier. Frequent showering and hand washing can also dry out your skin. Keep skin moist with lotion or cream immediately after you shower and wash your hands to seal in moisture.

No matter what season you’re in, if your dry skin becomes inflamed or develops a painful itch, visit our practice for a proper evaluation and treatment plan. A dermatologist can help you modify your current skin regimen accordingly to help your skin stay healthy with the changing seasons.

By Dermatology Associates
September 05, 2017
Category: Dermatology
Tags: botox  

Wrinkles can be unfair: they can make you look tired, annoyed, or older than you actually feel. The eyes are one of the most noticeable botoxaspects of the face and, unfortunately, the wrinkles that surround them are attention-grabbing as well. But with Botox from your Indianapolis, Batesville, and Tipton, IN, dermatologist, Dr. Sonya Campbell Johnson, you can eliminate the unwanted attention your wrinkles bring to your features, letting your best traits take center stage! Learn more about how Botox can help you here.

How does Botox work?

Botox, derived from proteins that occur in nature, is purified in a laboratory and has been utilized for many years as a way to treat medical issues such as sweating or eye problems. Approved by the FDA for cosmetic use since the early 2000's, Botox can make a big difference in your appearance by stopping the muscle movement under the skin where your wrinkles lie. Your Indianapolis, Batesville, and Tipton dermatologist uses a fine needle to carefully insert the solution into the muscles on the outside of your eyes ("crow's feet") and between them ("frown lines"), which causes them to become temporarily paralyzed. Over a period of a few days, the skin on top of these muscles will gradually smooth out because of the lack of muscle activity, leaving you with a naturally smoother appearance for three to four months.

Is Botox safe?

The safety of Botox has been well-studied. It has been used for medical treatments of muscle spasms since the late 1980s and provides temporary, but effective relief from conditions like uncontrollable blinking and vocal cord issues. When used in a medical setting like Dermatology Associates in Indianapolis, Batesville, and Tipton patients can be assured that cosmetic Botox is safely and responsibly used by qualified medical professionals.

If you'd like to erase years from your appearance and see a more rejuvenated reflection in the mirror, we encourage you to contact Dermatology Associates in Indianapolis, Batesville, and Tipton, Indiana at (317) 257-1484.You can also email us at [email protected] We look forward to helping you look and feel your best!

By Dermatology Associates
September 01, 2017
Category: Skin Care

Skin TypeSkin care should be an important part of your daily hygiene. This should include cleansing the face daily, moisturizing, applying sunscreen and avoiding harsh products. A good skin care routine starts with understanding the unique needs of your skin type. In many cases, skin can be classified into four different categories: normal, dry, oily and combination.  

To determine your type of skin, try this simple test:

  • Wash your face and gently pat it dry.
  • Wait approximately 15 minutes and then press lens-cleaning tissue paper on different areas of your face.
  • If the paper sticks or picks up oil on all parts of your skin, then you have oily skin.
  • If the paper does not stick on any part of your face, then you have dry skin.
  • If the paper only sticks to your chin, nose and forehead, then you have normal or combination skin.

Normal Skin Types
The ideal skin type, normal skin is characterized by a smooth, even tone and usually blemish free.  It also tolerates most skin care lotions and creams. A regular skin care regimen combined with a balanced diet is often enough to maintain healthy, youthful skin.

Dry Skin Types
People with dry skin lack natural moisture. Dry skin may flake during the winter months, and chapping or cracking may occur when skin is extremely dry or dehydrated. Applying gentle moisturizer throughout the day and drinking plenty of water can help relieve dryness and also fight against premature aging. Avoid overexposure to the sun, harsh winds and smoking which can aggravate dry skin.

Oily Skin Types
If you have oily skin, you may be more prone to acne due to excessive oil secretions (sebum) on the face. Oily skin may appear greasy, and is commonly seen among adolescents due to hormonal changes which increase production of sebum. To manage oily skin, use cosmetics sparingly and only apply oil-free products when possible. Wash skin once or twice a day, avoid lotions and creams and always remove makeup before going to bed.

Combination Skin Types
Combination skin is a blend of both dry and oily skin, most often characterized by an oily T-zone (forehead, nose and chin) and a dry neck and cheeks.  Different parts of the face may require slightly different care. Applying a toner or anti-acne product on the T-zone to remove residual oils and impurities may be helpful in managing oily skin, while a mild moisturizer may be needed for the cheeks.

Having trouble determining your skin type? Visit your dermatologist for expert skin care advice and a personalized treatment plan for every type of skin. The state of our skin is affected by nutrition, general and emotional health, exercise and genes. How well you care for your skin will play an important role in achieving your healthy glow.

By Dermatology Associates
August 01, 2017
Category: Nail Health
Tags: Nail Care  

NailsThe nails take a lot of abuse. From gardening and dishes to regular wear and tear, harsh chemicals and hard work can really take a toll on the condition of fingernails and toenails. Many nail problems can be avoided with proper care, but others may actually indicate a serious health condition that requires medical attention.  

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, nail problems comprise about 10 percent of all skin conditions, affecting a large number of older adults. Brittle nails are common nail problems, typically triggered by age and the environment. Other conditions include ingrown toenails, nail fungus, warts, cysts or psoriasis of the nails. All of these common ailments can be affectively treated with proper diagnosis from a dermatologist.

Mirror on Health

A person’s nails can reveal a lot about their overall health. While most nail problems aren’t severe, many serious health conditions can be detected by changes in the nails, including liver diseases, kidney diseases, heart conditions, lung diseases, diabetes and anemia. That’s why it’s important to visit your dermatologist if you notice any unusual changes in your nails.

Basic Nail Care

It’s easy to neglect your nails, but with basic nail care, you can help keep your fingernails and toenails looking and feeling great. Here’s how:

  • Keep nails clean and dry to prevent bacteria from building up under the nail.
  • Cut fingernails and toenails straight across to prevent ingrown nails and trauma.
  • Avoid tight-fitting footwear.
  • Apply an anti-fungal foot powder daily or when needed.
  • Avoid biting and picking fingernails, as infectious organisms can be transferred between the fingers and mouth.
  • Wear gloves to protect your fingernails when doing yard work or cleaning house to protect the nails from harsh chemicals and trauma.
  • When in doubt about self-treatment for nail problems, visit your dermatologist for proper diagnosis and care.

Always notify a dermatologist of nail irregularities, such as swelling, pain or change in shape or color of the nail. Remember, your nails can tell you a lot about your overall health, and a dermatologist can help determine the appropriate treatment for any of your nail problems.

By Dermatology Associates
July 03, 2017
Category: Skin Condition

Poison IvyIf you spend time outdoors, then you’ve probably come into contact with poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac at some point in your life. The plants’ oily sap, known as urushiol causes many people to break out in an itchy rash. Urushiol is colorless or pale yellow oil that exudes from any cut part of the plant, including the roots, stems and leaves.

The intensely itchy rash is an allergic reaction to the sap and can appear on any part of the body. The severity of the reaction varies from person to person, depending on how much sap penetrates the skin and how sensitive the person is to it. The most common symptoms include:

  • Itchy skin
  • Redness or streaks
  • Hives
  • Swelling
  • Small or large blisters
  • Crusting skin when blisters have burst

When other parts of the body come into contact with the oil, the rash may continue to spread to new parts of the body. A common misconception is that people can develop the rash from touching another person’s poison ivy rash. However, you cannot give the rash to someone else. The person has to touch the actual oil from the plant in order have an allergic reaction.

When to See Your Dermatologist

Generally, a rash from poison ivy, oak or sumac will last 1 to 3 weeks and will go away on its own without treatment. But if you aren’t sure whether or not your rash is caused by poison ivy, or if you need treatment to relieve the itch, you may want to visit a dermatologist for proper diagnosis and care. You should also see your dermatologist if the rash is serious, in which case prescription medicine may be necessary. Swelling is a sign of serious infection.

Other signs that your rash may be serious include:

  • Conservative treatments won’t ease the itch
  • Rash begins to spread to numerous parts of the body
  • Pus, pain, swelling, warmth and other signs of infection are accompanying the rash
  • Fever
  • Facial swelling, especially on the eyelids
  • Rash develops on face, eyelids, lips or genitals
  • Breathing or swallowing becomes difficult

To avoid getting the rash caused by poison ivy, oak or sumac, learn how to recognize what these plants look like and stay away. Always wear long pants and long sleeves when you anticipate being in wooded areas, and wear gloves when gardening. If you come into contact with the plants, wash your skin and clothing immediately.  

Poison ivy, oak and sumaccan be a real nuisance and often difficult to detect. As a general rule, remember the common saying, “Leaves of three—let them be.” And if you do get the rash, visit our office for proper care.





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.